Where it all began

 

TruTouch was founded in 2005. The company’s first product - the TT1100/Guardian - was recognized by TIME Magazine on their list of ‘Best Inventions of 2006.’ The TT1100/Guardian was a breakthrough solution providing truly noninvasive blood alcohol measurements.

The next generation TruTouch product – the TT2500 - was a networked, self-calibrating, noninvasive, alcohol sensor with built-in identity verification (biometrics). It was designed for unattended detection of alcohol impaired workers before they entered a worksite. Using short-wavelength infrared light the TT2500 non-invasively detects alcohol out of all of the other chemicals that make up the skin. TT2500 systems have performed more than one million tests in real-world environments. The relative proportions of naturally occurring compounds that make up skin is unique to every individual enabling identity authentication during use.

 
                 TT100/Guardian

                TT100/Guardian

                          TT2500

                         TT2500

 
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Our Future

 

TruTouch is now focused on the next generation of its technology for touch-based alcohol sensing in automobiles. A completely solid-state alcohol sensor is being developed for the automotive market that promise significant cost, size and durability improvements over the TT2500.

The automotive development effort is supported by the Driver Alcohol Detection System for Safety (DADSS) program. The DADSS research program brings together the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) and the Automotive Coalition for Traffic Safety (ACTS), which represents the world’s leading automakers, in one of the most important government and private sector partnerships in recent years.

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Publications, Presentations and Grant Awards

·      CM Gardner, “Transmission versus reflectance spectroscopy for quantitation”, Journal of Biomedical Optics, 23(1), (2018).
https://doi.org/10.1117/1.JBO.23.1.018001

·      B Ver Steeg, "Noninvasive optical sensors for increased safety in law enforcement, industrial, and medical applications" in "Advances in Optics for Biotechnology, Medicine and Surgery XV", ECI Symposium Series, (2017). http://dc.engconfintl.org/biotech_med_xv/31

·      B Ver Steeg et al., Development of a solid state, non-invasive, human touch based blood alcohol sensor. Paper No. 17-0036. 25th International Technical Conference on the Enhanced Safety of Vehicles (ESV). Detroit, MI June 5-8, 2017
https://www-esv.nhtsa.dot.gov/Proceedings/25/25ESV-000036.pdf

·      L Cech et al., “Introduction of a Solid State Noninvasive Human Touch Based Alcohol Sensor,” Paper No. 15-0380, 24th International Technical Conference on the Enhanced Safety of Vehicles (ESV), Gothenburg, Sweden, June 8-11, 2015.
https://www-esv.nhtsa.dot.gov/Proceedings/24/files/24ESV-000380.PDF

·      T Ridder, B Ver Steeg, and G. Price, “Robust Calibration Transfer in Noninvasive Ethanol Measurements, Part I: Mathematical Basis for Spectral Distortions in Fourier Transform Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-NIR),” Applied Spectroscopy, 68(8), (2014).
https://doi.org/10.1366/13-07422

·      T Ridder, B Ver Steeg, B Laaksonen, and W Radigan, “Robust Calibration Transfer in Noninvasive Ethanol Measurements, Part II: Modification of Instrument Measurements by Incorporation of Expert Knowledge (MIMIK),” Applied Spectroscopy, 68(8), (2014).
https://doi.org/10.1366/13-07424

·      T Ridder, E Hull, B Ver Steeg, and B Laaksonen, “Comparison of Spectroscopically Measured Finger and Forearm Tissue Ethanol Concentration to Blood and Breath Ethanol Measurements,” Journal of Biomedical Optics, 16(2), (2011).
https://doi.org/10.1117/1.3535594

·      T Ridder, B Ver Steeg, B Laaksonen, “Comparison of Spectroscopically Measured Tissue Alcohol Concentration to Blood and Breath Alcohol Measurements,” Journal of Biomedical Optics, 14(5), (2009).
https://doi.org/10.1117/1.3253353

·      T Ridder, B Ver Steeg, S VanSlyke, and J Way, “Noninvasive NIR Monitoring of Interstitial Ethanol Concentration,” Proceedings of SPIE, 7186, (2009).
https://doi.org/10.1117/12.809944

·      C Brown and T Ridder, “Framework for Multivariate Selectivity Analysis, Part I: Theoretical and Practical Merits,” Applied Spectroscopy, 59(6), 787-803 (2005).
https://doi.org/10.1366/0003702054280621

·      T Ridder, C Brown, and B Ver Steeg, “Framework for Multivariate Selectivity Analysis, Part II: Experimental Applications,” Applied Spectroscopy, 59(6), 804-815 (2005).
https://doi.org/10.1366/0003702054280739

·      US National Institutes of Health/NIAAA Grant #1 R43 AA13677-01
https://www.sbir.gov/sbirsearch/detail/191846

·      B Ver Steeg and T Ridder, “A New Eye on Law Enforcement: Photonics Technology Enables Accurate Noninvasive Alcohol Testing,” oemagazine, v5, no 6, (2005)
http://spie.org/newsroom/a-new-eye-in-law-enforcement

·      T Ridder, S Hendee, and C Brown, “Noninvasive Alcohol Testing Using Diffuse Reflectance Near-infrared Spectroscopy,” Applied Spectroscopy, 59(2), 181-189 (2005).
https://doi.org/10.1366/0003702053085098

·      US National Institutes of Health/NIAAA Grant #1 R43 AA015862-01
https://www.sbir.gov/sbirsearch/detail/339518